Tag Archives: Big Pharma

Chapter 12, Preview of Covid-1984, The Musical

In this chapter, we are reliving the fall of 2020. Remember when we were still uncertain that the oligarchs were trying to kill us?  Remember when a few people who were pointing out the obvious were being called conspiracy theorists? Well, I trust my readers have smartened up a bit since then.

I finally bring Felix O’Brien onstage.  A couple of chapters ago, I hinted that the was going to show, but he never did. This time he appears in person.

What did you think when Orwell’s Winston approached O’Brien for help?  Did you guess it was a set up?

What about our situation here in real life?  Are there some who are seeking saviours in all the wrong places? Continue reading

Pathologies: Mass Hysteria and Auto-Immune Disease

Palacky University, Olomouc, Czechia
Biosemiotics Gathering June 26, 2022

Abstract My research has long been focused on trying to understand creativity from a Biosemiotic perspective. According to my theory of biosemiosis, a system is capable of intentional behavior insofar as the effect of its response to a sign tends to reinforce that type of response to that type of sign. This entrains the system to achieve its goal (it’s always sort of backward looking), but due to the flexible nature of signs, room for creative improvement exists insofar as chance structures can be harnessed as signs to achieve new goals (or same goals via new means). Significantly, the kind of chance I am looking at is not random; it is constrained by the relative similarity and relative proximity of the biological signs.

The other side of creativity by such biosemiosic means is pathology, e.g., mass hysteria, auto-immune disease, and unhealthy addictions. Óscar Castro García, J. Augustus Bacigalupi and I (2021) recently looked at the biosemiosic mechanisms underlying what could be called learned pathological behavior of slime mold. The world has lately witnessed similar kinds of pathology in the “mass formation” behavior, noted by psychologist Mattias Desmet (2022), that has arisen from propaganda related to the pandemic. Desmet’s theory is supported, I believe, by Continue reading

Chapter 11, Preview of Covid-1984, The Musical

In this Chapter, Winston and Julia read a draft copy of Koenig Schmidt’s book, Eusocial Capitalism, my version of Orwell’s book within the novel 1984.

In this introduction I want to relate what I learned from an article by Cynthia Chung on James Burnham’s The Managerial Revolution.  Burnham (not Trotsky as many assume) is the real inspiration behind Orwell’s Emmanuel Goldstein. Chung draws links between Burnham, a former Trotskyite turned neoCon, and Henry Kissinger, Klaus Schwab and the Great Reset, the agenda of which is presaged in Burnham’s writings:

“Effective class domination and privilege does, it is true, require control over the instruments of production; but this need not be exercised through individual private property rights. It can be done through what might be called corporate rights, possessed not by individuals as such but by institutions: as was the case conspicuously with many societies in which a priestly class was dominant…”

“If, in a managerial society, no individuals are to hold comparable property rights, how can any group of individuals constitute a ruling class?

The answer is comparatively simple and, as already noted, not without historical analogues. The managers will exercise their control over the instruments of production and gain preference in the distribution of the products, not directly, through property rights vested in them as individuals, but indirectly, through their control of the state which in turn will own and control the instruments of production. The state – that is, the institutions which comprise the state – will, if we wish to put it that way, be the ‘property’ of the managers. And that will be quite enough to place them in the position of the ruling class.”

I thank Chung for the insight that Schwab’s The Great Reset follows the tradition started by Burhnam and satirized by Orwell in 1984.  Klaus Schwab is his own worst enemy; the more people who become familiar with his writings, the sooner we will have a popular uprising against the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

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Chapter 8, Preview of Covid-1984, The Musical


I have not posted a new chapter for C0VlD-1984 for three weeks. This intermission was due to the fact that I finally got Covid, and then my elderly mom got it.

I’ve done my research. I know early treatments can be effective and I know what it’s like to see the vulnerable suffer from this really nasty bioweapon, whose spikes can cross the blood-brain barrier.

In this chapter, Winston meets with the coroner who has investigated the cause of his mother’s death. Was it due to remdesivir?

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Chapter 7, Preview of Covid-1984, The Musical

Suzanna Hamilton as Julia in Michael Radford’s 1984

In Chapter Seven the love story between Julia and Winston progresses further.  Orwell’s Julia has very little intellectual curiosity about the workings of the Party, which sort of confuses Winston, since he’s very interested.  Julia is more of a survivor than a reformer.  In my version of 1984, I follow Orwell’s lead again in setting up this kind of dynamic between the lovers. But I had to give my female character a little more smarts than Orwell did, since I find Orwell to be a bit sexist in his depiction of his empty-headed female lead. Orwell’s Julia works as a mechanic in the fiction-machine writing department at the Ministry of Truth.  (That’s nice comedy, Orwell.  It really is true that genre fiction might as well be written in a factory.) My Julia uses AI machine learning to create really awful academic papers using the latest feminist and transhumanist jargon.

This chapter is dedicated to my friend Daniel Donnelly. Thank you for your support.

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Chapter 6, Preview of Covid-1984, The Musical

Syme is my favorite character in Orwell’s novel. Remember him? No? He’s the nerdy linguist who is overly enthusiastic about his work reducing the English language to Newspeak. Syme is not a hero. He is one the villains in 1984. But he is a fascinating character in the way he has bought into the lies and helps bring about his own end.

Orwell understood that a natural language is an instrument of thought. If your instrument has plenty of flexibility, ambiguity, and redundancy it can be used creatively. Technologists hate that about language; they try to deny that language is wild and alive and cannot be tamed or reproduced mechanistically.

In this chapter, after bringing Julia and Winston a little closer together, I introduce my version of Syme, who, of course, works in AI translation, today’s equivalent of the Newspeak project.

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Chapter 5, Preview of “COVlD-1984, The Musical”

Chapter Five of “COVID-1984, The Musical” takes place in Russia.

I live in New York, ground zero of the two major crises this century,  but I was away from home on 9/11 and when Covid hit.

On 9/11, I was in Santa Fe. Planes were grounded and I was stuck. I wouldn’t  have been able to get to my home in Tribeca near the towers even if I had driven back to NYC because the whole area was restricted, with armed guards on every corner checking IDs, and my ID had an old address. So I stayed in my little casita, which had dial-up internet, no television, and I missed all the media coverage.

When the Anthrax scare quickly followed, I was in Belagio, Italy–at the Rockefeller Villa of all places, hobnobbing with a UN delegation–for the entire month of October 2001. Also no TV and no outside news. I didn’t even know about the Anthrax until I returned to the U.S.. Weird that it never came up in conversation at dinner.

And once again, in 2020 when the Covid lockdown commenced, I found myself far away from home, in St Petersburg, Russia. Again planes were grounded and I was stuck, but safe and not subjected to the U.S. news cycle.

I did not experience first-hand any of these traumatizing events.  I was never afraid that I would die.  I missed the 24/7 fear porn.  That may be one of several reasons why my perspective is different and I  seemed to be immune from Stockholm syndrome.

In this Chapter, I place my hero, Winston Smith, in Russia, so that you can see through his eyes how different the situation was there during lockdown.  I’m not saying their government is any better, but the people, the Russian people lived Orwell’s 1984 and they were not inclined to let the boot get back to stomping on their faces.

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Chapter 4, Preview of “COVlD-1984, The Musical”

I’m posting Chapter Four without an introduction. It’s been a tough few weeks in the anti-totalitarian trenches and I only have enough energy to work on the actual novel, not the chapter introductions.  The Covid Cultists are really ramping things up, which means they know they are losing.  Hang on.  The darkest day will come soon (literally on Dec 21) and after that, I promise, more light will come.

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Chapter 3, Preview of “COVlD-1984, The Musical”

Isolation is a form of torture. It’s dehumanizing.

George Orwell chose to create characters for his dystopian vision who had been dehumanized after generations of living under a totalitarian regime. When Winston first sees Julia, he fantasizes about smashing her brains out with a rock. Julia is portrayed as having simple animal instincts, surviving only to enjoy a few barnyard pleasures before slaughter. As compelling as Orwell’s narrative is in other ways, it’s often difficult to relate to Winston and Julia on a personal level, and it’s hard to imagine them as heroes.  The reader wonders, Will they be able to regain a sense of human dignity?

Today, many people are being pushed into isolation. How do you date during a lockdown? How do you share a kiss when you don’t even shake hands anymore? How do you smile behind a mask?  There’s a new Puritanical campaign against human intimacy and physical connectedness that could irrevocably harm a generation or two.

In Chapter Three, I introduce my idea of love in a time of totalitarianism.

(Need to catch up? Go to Chapter One.)

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Chapter 2, Preview of “Covid-1984, The Musical”

Preview of Covid-1984 The Musical, Chapter Two.  (Not ready yet? To catch up, go to Chapter One.)

This installment is dedicated to Thomas, Heather and Valerie. Thank you for your support.

Orwell fans will appreciate Chapter Two as I begin to follow the outline of 1984’s opening scenes. As I noted in my introduction to the first chapter, I’m releasing this novel in installments even though I haven’t yet written the final chapters.  I hope to provide us “proles” with a way to imagine how to bring down the Big Brother machine, because bring it down we must.  Let’s make (up) history together. I still don’t know exactly how my Winston Smith is going to overcome the propaganda and the torture, but I’m getting some ideas when I look around me and I see all the people in the streets and online standing up and saying, I will not comply.

Keep up hope. Keep  your sense of gallows humor. Keep singing. Danser Encore.  It shows our strength, and it’s really disconcerting for our would-be tyrants. Continue reading